• Marin

    It´s your lifestyle! You want the best from all worlds -
    whether you are off for the summer or heading out to take
    on a speed duel in the club, go with MARIN. Feel free to
    reach exciting bays and new ports with total confidence.
    Seize the moment! Durability and performance go hand in hand.

Different layouts

  • X-CUT
  • TRIOPT
  • EPEX
  • X-CUT
    A cross-cut sail (x-cut) consists of a number of horizontal panels parallel to each other and perpendicular to the leech. This is a very cost-effective way of producing a sail, making it affordable and long-lasting. Being the first sail-design on the market, the x-cut sail has a long and proven track-record.
    Cross-cut sails are typically made from a woven polyester cloth with straight fill yarns that are stronger than the warp yarns. The strong fill yarns are aligned with the load bearing direction of the sail resulting in a very durable sail.
  • TRIOPT
    Trioptimal layout is also referred to as radial, since the panels are radial typically oriented towards the corners of the sail resulting in a triangular shape. This layout distributes the forces the sail is exposed to optimally and helps maintain the shape of the sail. The panels that make up the radial layout are carefully arranged to follow the load pattern, ensuring a strong and stable sail.
    Upwind sails in a trioptimal layout are typically made from a laminate cloth, that is a sandwich cloth constructed of more layers. However, you will find a few trioptimal designs in a woven polyester cloth, and most nylon downwind sails are designed in a trioptimal cut.
  • EPEX
    The unique and patented EPEX membrane technology is the flagship of Elvstrøm Sails. A 100 % custom design where every single yarn is placed according to a load path design, computer calculated to the individual sailing preference. This enables the absolute optimal distribution of fibers over the entire sail resulting in an outstanding shape stability and performance.
    A broad range of materials and fibers are available to meet every need. The components are bonded under extreme and constant vacuum that evacuates all air, holds the membrane in place, and compresses the membrane components.

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See different material combinations

Furling Jib - Woven Dyneema, Hydranet

This furling jib is made from a solid woven polyester cloth or woven dyneema, keeping the nice white look for years and years to come. The cross-cut sail design is a widely used design that is a very price conscious choice. Battens which are orientated parallel with the headstay will ensure a more stable leech and flatter exit. This sail is normally delivered with UV protection in the foot and leech, and E-Flex in the luff for better shape when the sail is partly furled in / reefed in heavy wind. 

Material

Woven Dyneema is a strong sail cloth, tightly woven as a high tenacity fabric. The woven dyneema cloths are polyester fibers with a grid of dyneema.

 

Performance - Durability - Price

Performance, durability and price indicators are illustrated for each material combination on a scale from 1-10, 10 being the highest.

 

Other Headsails

If the above product example is not what you are looking for, check out all the other mainsails in this layout in our Marin segment.

  • Jib - no battens
  • Jib - short battens
  • FatFurl Jib
  • Self-tacking Jib
  • Self-tacking furling Jib
  • FatFurl Self-tacking Jib
  • Genoa
  • Furling Genoa
  • Staysail
  • Furling Staysail
  • Furling JibTop
  • Heavy Weather Jib
  • Storm Jib
  • Wing Jib
  • Jib - no battens

    Jib - no battens

    Sail Type
    The all-round jib is the working headsail for upwind sailing in most wind conditions when there is no furling gear to handle the sail. It is sheeted in front of the shrouds which gives the possibility of being trimmed with a narrow sheeting angle.

    Some options are e.g. trim stripes, different clew and tack attachments, race head and foil bag. A reef could also be fitted to this sail as that will reduce the area to a typical heavy weather jib area.

    Layout
    Available in crosscut, trioptimal and EPEX.

    When to use
    The all-round jib can be used in most wind conditions.
  • Jib - short battens

    Jib - short battens

    Sail Type
    The all-round jib is the working headsail for upwind sailing in most wind conditions when there is no furling gear to handle the sail. It is sheeted in front of the shrouds which gives the possibility of being trimmed with a narrow sheeting angle.

    The sail may be with or without battens. If you choose battens, normally the top batten will be full and the lower ones short. A sail with battens will be wider in the upper parts and thus more efficient.

    Some other options are e.g. trim stripes, different clew and tack attachments, race head and foil bag. A reef could also be fitted to this sail as that will reduce the area to a typical heavy weather jib area.

    Layout
    Available in crosscut, trioptimal and EPEX.

    When to use
    The all-round jib can be used in most wind conditions.
  • FatFurl Jib

    FatFurl Jib

    Sail Type
    The fatfurl jib is the working headsail for upwind in most wind conditions. It is sheeted in front of the shrouds which gives the opportunity of trimming with a narrow sheeting angle.

    The sail is supplied with both full and short battens that runs parallel to the forestay to make the furling work perfectly.

    The full battens in front of the sail give the opportunity to design the sail with a large area in the upper part of the sail, which again gives a more efficient sail for all conditions; more powerful in light winds because of the larger sail area and more “self-tuning” in heavy winds because the big roach in the upper parts will twist and flattens the sail in heavy winds.

    Some of the options are normally 2+2 battens, trim stripes, different clew attachments, UV cover in foot and leech.

    Layout
    Available in trioptimal and EPEX.

    When to use
    The FatFurl jib can be used in most wind conditions.
  • Self-tacking Jib

    Self-tacking Jib

    Sail Type
    The self-tacking jib is the working headsail for upwind in most wind conditions when there is no furling gear to handle the sail, and you are going to sheet it on your self-tacking track.

    The sail may be with or without battens. If you choose battens, normally the top batten will be full and the lower ones short. A sail with battens will be wider in the upper parts and thus more efficient. For many boats/rigs the self-tacking jib may be small in light conditions. A Code 0 sail could in other words be very good to combine with the self-tacker to be able to fully enjoy the sailing in all conditions.

    In addition to battens, other options are e.g. clew board, trim stripes, different tack attachments and race head foil bag.

    Layout
    Available in crosscut, trioptimal and EPEX.

    When to use
    The self-tacking jib can be used in most wind conditions.
  • Self-tacking furling Jib

    Self-tacking furling Jib

    Sail Type
    The self-tacking furling jib is the working headsail for upwind in most wind conditions when the usage is handled with furling gear. The sail is sheeted on your self-tacking track.

    The sail may be with or without battens. If you choose battens, they will be parallel with the forestay to make the furling work perfectly.

    A sail with battens will be slightly bigger than without. For many boats/rigs the self-tacking jib may be small in light conditions. A Code 0 sail could in other words be very good to combine with the self-tacker to be able to fully enjoy the sailing in all conditions.

    In addition to battens other options are e.g. clew board, trim stripes and UV cover in foot and leech.

    Layout
    Available in crosscut, trioptimal and EPEX.

    When to use
    The selftacking furling jib can be used in most wind conditions.
  • FatFurl Self-tacking Jib

    FatFurl Self-tacking Jib

    Sail Type
    The self-tacking fat furl jib is the working headsail for upwind in most wind conditions. The sail is sheeted on your self-tacking track.

    The sail is supplied with both full and short battens that runs parallel to the forestay to make the furling work perfectly. The full battens in front of the sail make it possible to design the sail with a large area in the upper parts of the sail resulting in a more efficient sail for all conditions. More powerful in light winds because of the larger sail area and more “self-tuning” in heavy winds because the big roach in the upper parts will twist and flatten the sail in heavy winds.

    Even though the fatfurl jib is powerful, many boats/rigs may be underpowered in light wind with a self-tacking jib. A Code 0 sail could in other words be very good to combine with the self-tacking fat furl jib to be able to fully enjoy the sailing in all conditions.

    Normally the sail is equipped with 2 full plus 2 short battens and other options are e.g. trim stripes, clew board and UV cover in foot and leech.

    Layout
    The sail is available in trioptimal and EPEX.

    When to use
    The selftacking fatfurl jib can be used in most wind conditions.
  • Genoa

    Genoa

    Sail Type
    The genoa is a sail that overlaps the mast. Normally the LP (perpendicular measurement from clew to luff) is between 135- 150% of the boats J-measurement. This makes the sail efficient in light and medium winds.

    Since the sail overlaps the rig, battens are not possible. The luff can be attached to the forestay with foil, metal hooks or soft hanks of different types.

    Some of the options available are e.g. different tack and clew attachments, telltale windows, trim stripes and race zipperbag.

    Layout
    The sail is available in crosscut, trioptimal and EPEX.

    When to use
    The genoa is efficient in light and medium winds.
  • Furling Genoa

    Furling Genoa

    Sail Type
    The furling genoa is the primary headsail for boats built and set up for overlapping headsails. When used fully unfurled, it gives the boat power in light and medium winds.

    The furling genoa can be delivered with a reefing compensator that makes the shape of the sail flatter and efficient also in reefed condition, when the wind increases.

    In addition to the reefing compensator other options are e.g. UV in leech and foot, trim stripes and sail number.

    A furling headsail that is left on the boat furled in when not in use needs to be protected against degrading from UV. This can be done either with a layer of cloth (e.g. acrylic/polyester) sewn on in leech and foot or with a furlcover that is hoisted with a spinnaker halyard.

    Layout
    The sail is available in crosscut, trioptimal and EPEX.

    When to use
    The furling genoa is efficient in light and medium winds.
  • Staysail

    Staysail

    Sail Type
    The staysail is perfect for heavy upwind sailing, sparing the working headsail from the toughest conditions.

    The flat shape and reduced sail area make heavy weather sailing fun, as the boat is well balanced and easy to handle. It is used on an inner forestay, very often with hooks mounted in the luff of the sail.

    Some of the available options are e.g. battens, different tack and clew attachments and race zipperbag.

    Layout
    The sail is available in crosscut, trioptimal and EPEX.

    When to use
    The staysail is for heavy winds.
  • Furling Staysail

    Furling Staysail

    Sail Type
    The Furling staysail is perfect for heavy upwind sailing, sparing the working headsail from the toughest conditions.

    This sail can be used mainly in two different ways; on a permanent mounted furling system inside and below the normal headstay, or with an AT cable in the luff of the sail to be used as a free flying furling staysail. In the last case a 2:1 halyard or maybe a lock system mounted in the mast may be required.

    The jib can also be used as a staysail on the same side as the mainsail to balance the boat, when sailing wing and wing with your main- and headsail.

    Some of the options for permanent furling system are UV cover in leech and foot, reefing compensator, different clew attachments and trim stripes. Some of the options for free flying – furling: AT cable, different clew attachments, trim stripes and race zipperbag.

    Layout
    The sail is available in crosscut, trioptimal and EPEX.

    When to use
    The furling staysail is for heavy winds.
  • Furling JibTop

    Furling JibTop

    Sail Type
    The furling Jib Top (sometimes referred to as a Furling Yankee) equals a (large) overlapping furling genoa in size, at typically 140-150% LP. The sail is designed to perform at open courses, typically from 50-120 degrees on true wind.

    It is designed with a high clew, that contributes to more control of the leech and thus easier trimming.

    It will work nicely in combination with a self-tacking furling jib, when reaching and in light wind conditions.

    Some of the options are e.g. UV cover in leech and foot, reefing compensator, trim stripes and sail number.

    Layout
    The sail is available in crosscut, trioptimal and EPEX.

    When to use
    The furling jip top is for light winds.
  • Heavy Weather Jib

    Heavy Weather Jib

    Sail Type
    The Heavy Weather Jib is perfect for heavy upwind sailing, sparing the working headsail from the toughest conditions.

    The flat shape and reduced area make heavy weather sailing fun as the boat is well balanced and easy to handle. It is best suited if you do not have a furling headsail as this sail is designed to go on the normal forestay. That is only the heavy weather jib can be at the stay when sailing.

    Some of the options are e.g. battens, head pennant, different tack and clew attachments and race zipper bag.

    Layout
    The sail is available in crosscut, trioptimal and EPEX.

    When to use
    The heavy weather jib is perfect for heavy upwind sailing.
  • Storm Jib

    Storm Jib

    Sail Type
    The storm jib is designed for unpredictable weather situations and thus important to bring on your boat e.g. if you are going to sail long distance or distances where the wind is hard to predict.

    There are many different solutions on how to set the sail regarding luff details. Consult your sailmaker to find the best way for your boat and crew.

    Layout
    The sail is available in crosscut.

    When to use
    The storm jib is perfect for distances with unpredictable weather situations.
  • Wing Jib

    Wing Jib

    Sail Type
    The wing jib is a supplement to modern yachts, especially suitable with a furling self-tacking jib. To gain better control of your steering when the wind picks up, you simply furl in your self- tacking jib and hoist the wing jib, around the roller forestay.

    With the wing jib you can be prepared for the windy situation where helming and trimming with your bigger headsail becomes difficult. The clew corners of a wing jib are placed much higher than on the traditional self-tacking jib, which makes it a lot easier to trim the sail. The sail is two-plied and thus easily hoisted around the existing forestay.

    The wing jib can be designed as a storm jib as well as a heavy weather jib, all depending on the sailing conditions you expect.

    Some options are zipperbag and different tack/clew solutions.

    Layout
    The sail is available in crosscut.

    When to use
    The wing jib is effective when the wind picks up.

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